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Practicing Gratitude and Celebrating Recovery

Gratitude is an important part of recovery. Not only does it keep you grounded, it helps you to keep a more positive attitude, stay motivated, and overcome challenges that you face. You’re able to look at life from a different perspective and recognize the things you are grateful for and may have previously taken for granted.

Thanksgiving is a wonderful time to reflect and appreciate how far you have come in your recovery and your life. Look at all of the things you are doing now that you didn’t think were possible before. You have the opportunity to turn things around and make positive changes in your life. Take a moment to tell those around you how much they mean to you and how grateful you are for their continued support throughout your recovery. There are many ways to celebrate the progress you have made and practice gratitude this holiday season.

  • Start a Gratitude Journal

In addition to just reflecting on what you’re grateful for, write it down. This isn’t something to do just on Thanksgiving – it’s something to continue all year long. Force yourself to slow down and see the good in each day. Sometimes it’s big things like landing a new job, and sometimes it’s little things like your spouse has dinner ready when you get home or snuggling with your dog.

Write down a few things each day that you are grateful for or appreciate. It may be tough at first, but slowly your thinking will change and it will be easier to identify these moments. A great thing about keeping a journal is that it gets your thoughts out on paper and allows you to go back and look at your list later on. When you’re having a rough day, read through previous entries for a pick-me-up and a reminder of the good things in life.

  • Give Back by Volunteering and Helping Others

Everyone’s life is different. Share your time, talent, and passion by giving back to others. Raise awareness about a cause that is meaningful to you or help at a special event, serve food at a soup kitchen, sort donations, or volunteer at your child’s school. Seeing the difference your efforts make in the lives of others can be very rewarding. It can also help you to appreciate what you have and not take things for granted. Just as people have supported you in your recovery, support others in their lives.

You can do simple things on your own too. Rake leaves for an elderly neighbor, surprise a friend with flowers from your garden, or pay it forward the next time you’re in line at a store or restaurant. Giving back can help you maintain a greater sense of purpose and a positive attitude. The smile on someone’s face and appreciation in their eyes can bring a smile to your face as well and turn a bad day around.

  • Celebrate Milestones and Goals in Your Recovery

Don’t forget to take time to celebrate yourself and your progress. Reaching goals you have set for yourself can boost your self-esteem, motivation, and sense of accomplishment. As you hit each milestone, you realize that you’re closer to the next one. Break down bigger goals into more manageable parts so that they are achievable, and you’re not setting yourself up for disappointment. It may take longer than you thought to get there, but you’ll make it.

Treat yourself to something special, go out to dinner with friends, or mark the occasion in another way that is meaningful to you. It can be as public or private as you’d like. Remind yourself of your hard work and that it is not for nil. You’re making progress each day, and that is something for which to be grateful.

  • Make the Most of New Opportunities

Recovery is a time of change. It’s a time to move past destructive behaviors and embrace positive, constructive ones. Try new hobbies and activities. You never know what will resonate with you and become a powerful part of your lifestyle in recovery. Northbound’s In Vivo® model empowers clients to live life on life’s terms. Healthy coping skills are practiced in real life settings and clients receive the support they need to work through the challenges, setbacks, joys, and accomplishments of life in recovery. Recovery is your chance to make the most of your future, hold yourself accountable, and thrive while living substance-free.

Living Life One Day at a Time

Recovery is not something that happens overnight. It takes time, effort, commitment, and a network of support. Make the most of each day as it comes and don’t get too caught up in the past or the future. Live in the here and now. Practicing gratitude can help you to do just that.

Northbound walks alongside you each step of the way, from your decision to enter treatment through celebrating milestones in recovery. With a full continuum of care and a strong alumni support program, you’ll receive the individualized care and ongoing support that you need to embrace your new lifestyle and implement positive changes. You can transition back into society feeling more self-assured and knowing that you have the knowledge, skills, and strategies to live a healthier life and reduce risk of relapse.

Change is possible and long-term recovery is attainable. Northbound addresses both addiction and mental health for more comprehensive treatment. In recovery you can focus on physical, mental, emotional, social, and spiritual healing and how all of these elements work together in your life. Create a path for your future that works for you and your needs while balancing your recovery. Northbound helps you to put all of the pieces in place and feel more confident moving forward. Give yourself more reasons to be grateful this year by choosing to enter addiction treatment and making your health and well-being a priority.

Make the choice to enter treatment at Northbound today so you can appreciate everything you have to be thankful for.

Article Reviewed by Paul Alexander

Paul AlexanderPaul Alexander is the founder and CEO of Northbound Treatment. He received his Certified Addiction Treatment Specialist training at Saddleback College in Mission Viejo, CA, and was awarded Outstanding Alumni Service Award in 2002. Paul holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in Criminology, Law and Society, Summa Cum Laude, from University of California, Irvine, and a Juris Doctorate degree from Loyola Law School of Los Angeles. He believes wholeheartedly in transformational leadership, organizational health and effective, fully integrated substance use disorder treatment.

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